CONFIDENCE

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CONFIDENCE

Confidence - An Essential Leadership trait

con•fi•dence
ˈkänfədəns/
noun
•    the feeling or belief that one can rely on someone or something; firm trust.
•    the state of feeling certain about the truth of something.


For most leaders there may a few attributes that might not require optimal effort on their part for success. Unfortunately, Confidence is not one of them. In the repertoire of all that a leader possesses, confidence is vitally essential for positive motion forward. It is one of those things that either you have or don’t. But I believe it is a trait that it can be learned, adapted and practiced.

Confidence is totally your internal perception of your ability to fulfill a particular role. The core of it is built through your professional and personal experiences and dealings during you lifelong journey. There is a lot that goes into that. Successes and failures, disappointments and accolades. You ability to be confident has a memory. With good and positive memories that reinforced well, then being confident may be easier. When your journey is plagued with bumps and distractions it may be high mountain to climb to feel confident. The mere fact that you have failed or come up short in the past is not exclusion from confidence but rather a trading ground for future success. Either way, as a leader you have to possess this skill. 

To build your confidence you need to be very open to challenging the process and embarking on new experiences where you are willing to fail. Without this type of mindset  you’ll never grow and find the strength needed to push the limits of what you’re capable of. This is what it takes to allow others to gravitate toward your leadership and capture the confidence you possess. 

You gain strength, courage and confidence by every positive or negative experience in which you encounter. Confidence is not by happenstance, it is an intentional effort to be inspiring to the edge of you capability and then going beyond. 

The way to develop self-confidence is to do the thing you fear and get a record of successful experiences behind you." William Jennings Bryan”

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Standards

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Standards

2. Standards:
stand•ard
ˈstandərd/
noun
1.    
a level of quality or attainment.
"their restaurant offers a high standard of service"
synonyms:    quality, level, grade, caliber, merit, excellence
"the standard of her work"


The term leader should be synonymous with the word standard. It would be a natural assumption that if one is a leader, then they should set a standard. In today's ever changing society that is often the farthest thing from the truth. What was once a standard has now been morphed into a sort of suggestion. Truth is truth. There should be no variation to it. Either it is true or it is not. Then the standard is truth. Nowadays it seems like truth is what we want to make it and it can be ever evolving. If that be the case, then there is no standard; hence no truth.

If we are going to be leaders with the wherewithal to transcend the times, then we need to not only have a standard but set it as well. Every leader must hold themselves personally accountable and to a much higher standard than that of others; even other good leaders. The core to a leader setting a high standard are his/her own morals and values that are uncompromising and forward facing. The standard cant be something that is kept on the back burner nor hidden for convenience. It must be open and evident for all to see for it true lay to be a standard.


Quote:
“The quality of a leader is reflected in the standards they set for themselves.”
Ray Kroc

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Self-Motivated

Self-Motivated

#1 - Self-motivated
[self-moh-tuh-vey-shuhn] 
noun
1. initiative to undertake or continue a task or activity without another's prodding or supervision.

It should be quite evident that to be a leader of any stature, the simple fact is, one must be motivated. We all realize that motivation may manifest itself in many forms. Some may be motivated by seeking the status in an organization, company or community, while others the fame that can make their stature larger that life. For some the outrageous finances that can purchase the trappings of immense success, or even the long awaited, well earned title; CEO, owner, president or partner. Each is definitely an accomplishment on its own merit, but all are acquired as external motivators. They are in some ways contingent on how others may act, feel, give permission or in certain situations present themselves. They are external factors that most often present volatile conditions that may or may not create an opportunity to be a good leader or even have the level of success that may be wanted.

Though external factors are always an opportunity for the success that most of us seek. It should not be the driving force. Far too often to we see individuals who have attained all the external marking of leadership success only to find themselves miserable and unfulfilled. This is a direct effect of seeking things as a motivator only to acquire them and be disillusioned by the absence of a future motivator. 

Those that are internally motivated, or for this matter self-motivated, are less likely to seek titles or position but more importantly significance. The driving force is derived from an internal sense of purpose or  fulfillment and doing your best; not for self, but others. Being a change agent is more important than the bottom line. 

If when asked “what do you do?” and your only response is a description of your job, then maybe you need to rethink things.  The self-motivation is more than your job, position, bank account or address. This motivation should determine who you are and what you do irrespective of your position. Don let the situation determine who you are. Let who you are be determined no matter the situation that presents itself.

Two Thoughts:
•    You are not your job nor should it define who you are. There is a greater motivation in you. Seek it!!
•    This is what not being defined by a job would sound like. 
o    I inspire others to feel better about themselves and their appearance. Orthodontist
o    I create an atmosphere for others to thrive and accomplish their dreams. Educator 

One Question:
•    What is the greatest self motivator you have?

Quote:
“No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.”
– Eleanor Roosevelt